GI Conditions

Digestive care illustration

Acid Reflux, Heartburn and GERD

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a more serious form of gastroesophageal reflux more commonly known as heartburn or acid reflux. Acid reflux occurs when the lower esophageal sphincter opens spontaneously, or does not close properly, and stomach contents rise up into the esophagus. When acid reflux occurs, food or fluid can be tasted in the […] ...Read More about Acid Reflux, Heartburn and GERD...

Autoimmune Hepatitis

Autoimmune hepatitis is a disease in which the body’s immune system attacks liver cells. This immune disorder causes inflammation of the liver, also called hepatitis. Autoimmune hepatitis is typically chronic, meaning it can last for years and can lead to cirrhosis (scarring and hardening) of the liver. The disease is usually quite serious and, if […] ...Read More about Autoimmune Hepatitis...

Celiac Disease

Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease characterized by the intolerance of gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, rye and possibly oats. When someone with celiac disease consumes gluten, their immune system responds by damaging or destroying villi (the tiny finger-like protrusions that line the small intestine) in the digestive tract. These villi enable nutrients […] ...Read More about Celiac Disease...

Cirrhosis of the Liver

Cirrhosis is scarring of the liver. Scar tissue, which forms because of chronic injury or inflammation, replaces healthy liver tissue and blocks the normal flow of blood through the liver. A liver with too much scar tissue cannot work properly but early treatment can control symptoms and keep cirrhosis from getting worse. ...Read More about Cirrhosis of the Liver...

Constipation

Constipation is passage of hard, dry bowel movements, or less frequent movements, often fewer than three times a week. People who are constipated may find it difficult and painful to have a bowel movement. ...Read More about Constipation...

Crohn’s Disease

Crohn’s disease is a chronic digestive disease that causes inflammation of the digestive tract. It is also referred to as an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the general name for diseases that cause inflammation in the small intestine and/or colon. Although it most commonly affects the lower part of the small intestine, Crohn’s disease can affect […] ...Read More about Crohn’s Disease...

Diarrhea

Diarrhea is loose, watery, or frequent stools. A person with diarrhea typically passes stool more than three times a day. Acute diarrhea is a common problem that usually lasts less than 2 weeks and goes away on its own without any special treatment. Prolonged diarrhea, persisting more than 2 weeks, or diarrhea accompanied by a […] ...Read More about Diarrhea...

Diverticulosis/Diverticulitis

Diverticular disease affects the colon (the large intestine that removes waste from your body) and is made up of two conditions: diverticulosis and diverticulitis. Diverticulosis occurs when pouches, called diverticula, form in the colon. These diverticula bulge out like weak spots in a tire. Diverticulitis occurs when one or more diverticula become inflamed or infected. ...Read More about Diverticulosis/Diverticulitis...

Esophageal Cancer

Esophageal cancer is cancer that forms in the cells lining the esophagus. There are two types of esophageal cancer—squamous cell carcinoma (cancer that begins in flat cells lining the esophagus) and adenocarcinoma (cancer that begins in cells that make and release mucus and other fluids). According to the National Cancer Institute, there were 16,640 new […] ...Read More about Esophageal Cancer...

Gas

Everyone has gas. Burping and/or “passing gas” is normal. But because it is embarrassing, many people believe they pass gas too often or have too much gas. Most of the time, gas in the body is odorless. The odor of passed gas comes from sulfur made by bacteria in the large intestine. Sometimes gas causes […] ...Read More about Gas...

Helicobacter Pylori

H. pylori is a type of bacteria and H. pylori infection is common. The bacterium can cause peptic ulcers by damaging the stomach lining (mucosa) that produces the mucous coating protecting the stomach and duodenum. Damage to the mucous coating allows powerful stomach acid to get through to the sensitive lining beneath. Together, the stomach […] ...Read More about Helicobacter Pylori...

Hemochromatosis

Hemochromatosis is a common hereditary liver disease. It is caused by an increase in iron in the body or iron overload. Primary hemochromatosis, also called hereditary hemochromatosis, is an inherited disease. Secondary hemochromatosis is caused by anemia, alcoholism, and other disorders. Hemochromatosis causes the body to absorb and store too much iron. The extra iron […] ...Read More about Hemochromatosis...

Hemorrhoids

The area around your rectum and anus has clusters of veins that serve a useful purpose in helping to retain air, liquid and stool. When these veins become swollen or inflamed, we refer to them as hemorrhoids. There are different types of hemorrhoids; external hemorrhoids are located under the skin around the anus while internal […] ...Read More about Hemorrhoids...

Hepatitis A

The hepatitis A virus is found mostly in the stool and blood of an infected person about 15 – 45 days before symptoms occur and during the first week of illness. You can catch hepatitis A if: You eat or drink food or water that has been contaminated by stools (feces) containing the hepatitis A […] ...Read More about Hepatitis A...

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B infection is caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV).You can catch hepatitis B through contact with the blood or body fluids (such as semen, vaginal fluids, and saliva) of a person who has the virus. Exposure may occur: After a needle stick or sharp injury If any blood or other body fluid touches […] ...Read More about Hepatitis B...

Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C is an infectious liver disease caused by the Hepatitis C virus (HCV). As a blood-borne virus, HCV is spread primarily through blood-to-blood contact resulting in short-term illness or a long-term, chronic infection. Chronic HCV, which affects 70-85% of those infected, is a serious disease. It can result in long-term health problems or even […] ...Read More about Hepatitis C...

HPV & Anal Cancer

What is Human Papillomavirus (HPV)? HPV is a common virus that men and women get during skin-to-skin and sexual contact. HPV is extremely common and it is estimated that 90% of the population has been exposed to HPV at some point with infection rates exceeding 75% of sexually active adults.  HPV is relatively easily acquired, […] ...Read More about HPV & Anal Cancer...

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a very common disorder characterized by cramping, abdominal pain, bloating, constipation, and/or diarrhea. IBS causes a great deal of discomfort and distress, but it does not permanently harm the intestines and does not lead to a more serious disease, such as cancer. Most people can control their symptoms with a […] ...Read More about Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)...

Lactose Intolerance

Lactose intolerance is the inability or insufficient ability to digest lactose, a sugar found in milk and milk products. Lactose intolerance is caused by a deficiency of the enzyme lactase, which is produced by the cells lining the small intestine. Lactase breaks down lactose into two simpler forms of sugar called glucose and galactose, which […] ...Read More about Lactose Intolerance...

Liver Cancer

According to the National Cancer Institute, 15,000 men and 6,000 women are diagnosed each year with primary liver cancer (cancer that begins in the liver). Most are over 64 years old. Most primary liver cancers begin in liver cells (hepatocytes). This type of cancer is called hepatocellular carcinoma or malignant hepatoma. Normal cells grow and […] ...Read More about Liver Cancer...

Pancreatic Cancer

According to the National Cancer Institute, more than 43,000 people in the United States are diagnosed with pancreatic cancer each year. Most often, pancreatic cancer starts in the ducts that carry pancreatic enzymes, also referred to as exocrine pancreatic cancer. ...Read More about Pancreatic Cancer...

Pancreatitis

Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. The pancreas is a large gland behind the stomach and close to the duodenum (the first part of the small intestine) and in front of the spine. The pancreas secretes digestive juices into the duodenum through a tube called the pancreatic duct. These digestive juices contain pancreatic enzymes that, […] ...Read More about Pancreatitis...

Peptic Ulcer Disease

Peptic ulcers are common and affect more than 4 million people each year in the United States. A peptic ulcer is a sore on the lining of the stomach or duodenum (the beginning of the small intestine). Less commonly, a peptic ulcer may develop just above the stomach in the esophagus, the tube that connects […] ...Read More about Peptic Ulcer Disease...

Stomach Cancer

Stomach cancer, also referred to as gastric cancer, is a cancer that forms in tissues lining the stomach. According to the National Cancer Institute there were 21,000 new cases of stomach cancer reported in the United States in 2010. Stomach cancer usually begins in cells in the inner layer of the stomach. Over time, the […] ...Read More about Stomach Cancer...

Ulcerative Colitis

Ulcerative colitis is a disease that causes inflammation and ulcers (sores) in the lining of the large intestine. It is also referred to as an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the general name for diseases that cause inflammation in the intestinal tract. Ulcers form where inflammation has killed the cells that usually line the colon, then […] ...Read More about Ulcerative Colitis...